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A few words from Rob K9RST…

In scouting, we have an Eagle Scout Award.  It is a coveted honor that only a very select few ever achieve. (They claim only one out of a hundred receive the honor).  The final step in the journey is to create a service project.   In recent times, the process has leaned much more on the planning stages of that project.  In fact, the mantra generally is, “plan it so that if you cannot attend your project, someone else can pick it up and run it.”  Planning is everything. For a 12 – 18-year-old young man, this can be a considerable challenge.  And, to be honest, there are times when I wonder if we are expecting too much from these young men.  How many adults could ever meet these expectations?  Well, I met someone!!

As you know, we recently had our club’s annual action.  This is an overwhelming task to organize and price the donated items.  First, you must collect the stuff, see if it functions and then price it appropriately.  For years, Ron Harroff defined this job and he did it so well, that no one ever thought he would leave!  Well, last year he retired to Florida!  I was more than a little concerned about who would take this position over, but then Burt Krain spoke up.  Now, Burt has been down this block before. He has helped many folks manage their radio estates.  He had a passion for helping.  Burt jumped into the project and tackled it head on.  He and Cary Willis spent hours sorting, labelling, pricing and cataloging our donated items.  We had well over 300 items.  The work these guys did before the auction was simply amazing. 

A week before the auction, we had a Board meeting and one of the main topics was to discuss the auction.  Well, Burt was not able to attend.  Turns out he was in the hospital.  Next morning, we found out that his hospital stay was quite serious, and it was becoming very clear that Burt would not be around to help us with the auction. I know he was deeply upset that he could not attend the project he had been working on for weeks. So, here is the point…Burt did such a terrific job with the planning, that is was incredibly simple for others to pick up and run the auction.  We all could learn some lessons from this exercise.  That old Boy Scout notion “plan it so anyone could run it” found a real meaning here.

People stepped up to the challenge. It was really inspiring to watch and be part of the process.  Burt, it turns out, spent a week in the hospital and was able to keep up with the auction proceedings only by text! Thank you Cary and Burt for all that you did to make this year’s auction a success.  Also, thanks to all the donors…. without you there would be no auction!

Burt’s leadership is a lesson for all of us…on many levels.  I walked away thinking of the events and activities that I do and how many of them could I leave for others to carry forward?  I have some serious work to do on that front!

Our club has been blessed with many terrific leaders through the years.  We are about to lose another key player.  Ron Settle took on a position with company in Arizona and will be leaving in January.  Ron is an accomplished RF engineer and we benefited greatly from his expertise.  He will be missed.  I had been aware of Ron’s employment situation spent some time working on building a Tech team to support him in the event he had to quickly move from the area.  As a result, we have several people now in place who can help manage some of our on-going projects…that in no way diminishes the role Ron has played. We still need a knowledgeable and effective leader, but we take some solace in knowing that Ron will be an email away.  We wish Ron the very best with his new endeavors and thank him for his many years of dedicated service to this club. I will miss the friendship and opportunities to learn from a real expert. 

Finally, I am writing this in this tiny moment between Christmas and New Year’s.  Typically, this is my opportunity get some of the ham projects off my desk.  I have a huge pile up of stuff I must get done before Dayton because if they are not done by Dayton…I can’t buy more!  So, I am hoping for a quiet and productive Holiday, so I can clean my project desk off.  I make the same Resolution every year…so I can’t really call it a New Year’s resolution…but resolve to finish half of the ham kit projects I start!  That seems safe.

Thank you all for supporting this Club and ham radio.

73’s

 

Rob

K9RST

 

This past month you voted me into my 10th term as your Club President. That is a remarkable testament to your trust in my leadership (and perhaps my lunacy?), but I want to thank you for your support.  This would not have been possible without the incredible team that I have enjoyed working with over the years.  While I look forward to tackling the many projects, we strive to complete this next year, I am also mindful that this cannot last forever. For any organization to remain vital, we need new blood, new leaders with vision and energy.  This is my not so veiled attempt to encourage others to join us on the Board.  Meanwhile, I will continue to do my best to serve our members.

 

This past month, my old trusty Toyota finally died. Only 179,000 miles. It didn’t really die, but it required so many repairs it might as well have died.  The list of things that needed immediate repair were long and pricey…so, on my way home, I walked past a Chevy dealer and bought a new minivan.  I don’t typically agonize over these decisions – and now I am paying the price for being a little impetuous (plus, I had a business road trip I had to do later in the week and needed a car immediately.).  Among other things, I did not even think about the problem of installing a radio or placement of an antenna. Well, it turns out these are both rather formidable problems. These modern cars are loaded with electronic sensors and anything foreign (like a ham radio) is consider an intruder.  That does not even to address the issue of space!  Where the heck am I going to put my radios?  Fortunately, we had this terrific show and tell tutorial last summer and could see the many clever ways we have found to install radios into our modern cars.  I have done more researching these issues than I spent looking for the car.   I am now ready to take the installation plunge.  One fun problem…the battery compartment is under the rear passenger seat!  Now that’s a new one.  I have yet to crack the housing but that explains why I couldn’t immediately find the battery! Then I found a GM website site with some very practical tips: put the transceiver as far away from the front of the car as possible (like into the trunk) and use mag mount antennas to find the sweet spot (where the radio will least likely interfere with the car’s operation.)  All sound advice.  No question this will require remote mounts as there is virtually no space on the front panel to hang a radio.  I have been pondering this problem at the same time trying to discern what all these international short hand symbols mean for the more basic operations (like seat warmers, radio, odometer, wheel pressure etc., etc.)  (Remember when cars had an engine you could service yourself, a steering wheel, an accelerator and brakes.) Times have changed and along with all of the new comforts comes the warning: “danger to not fiddle with all these strange buttons while driving!”  Meanwhile, I also just discovered that I don’t have a hitch on this rig…and that is critical for my bike club work and my remote antenna mounts.  So, I am plowing through the aftermarket catalogs!  So, don’t buy cars like I do!!  Or, go ahead and just buy a car and then enjoy doing the research. And no, I am not willing to just hand the car over to a professional shop to do all the installations.  That’s my peculiar weakness. So, I am not complaining here, just sharing my journey to the dark side of buying a car if you are a serious mobile ham radio op. I am sure there will be more to come on this subject

Meanwhile, both the Bike Club and the Marathon had appreciation events for the volunteers. I could not go to the Marathon event because we had our club meeting that night, but it is great to see how much both organizations appreciate our service.  Again, thank you to all who volunteered to work these or any service projects. 

 

Happy Holidays to all.  See you at the auction in December.

 

Rob

K9RST

 

 

I have often spoken about this, but as a group, I have never found a better group of generous people than ham radio operators.  I suspect is it a natural extension of their gregarious nature, willing to talk to people all over the world in all manner of formats.   Evidence for this behavior is abundant…just witness the time and hour spent by Derick Bonewitz, Burt Krain, Don Whiteman, Dave Hewitt and others who spent several hours recently introducing ham radio and soldering skills to folks at the Northbrook Library.  Derick and Burt also did a similar show-and-tell at the Highland Park Library a few weeks back.  It is great to give ham radio a face…and a voice to a public that basically thinks we all died after the War (which war though?)

The Chicago Marathon is another amazing testament to the passion ham radio operators have for public service.  150 hams from 5 states signed up to support the medical team on the course.  The weather was bleak. Early morning rain and cold, it was not a fun assignment.  While working on this event – this was our tenth year – I have come to work alongside some incredibly talented people.  It has become one of the most rewarding activities I have been associated with since I got back into the hobby 10,000 Q’s ago (or so it seems).  These are people who bring their own gear, many pay for their own hotels and flights (one guy comes from San Francisco…as he has for the past 4 years!  He wrote me today to say that he has already bought his airline ticket for next yea.) Seeing all these folk’s report for duty at 5 a.m. and bring their “A” game is rewarding.  We have delivered for this event in countless ways.  We should all be proud of the work these folks have done in the name of ham radio.

Similarly, the NSRC has supported the Evanston Bike Club’s North Shore Century for 13 years.  I was biting my nails this year as many of our veteran supporters had to step away.  To my absolute delight we  ended up with a crop of new recruits. Some came down from Racine to help us…. not even sure how they heard about us? But, I was sure glad to have them.   I know this is not a life or death event, but for the 2300 bikers who challenge themselves to attempt a 100-mile run, we are a critical support team.  My only regret is that this event happens the same weekend as the NIDXA convention.  I really miss that event…and will have to find a way to recruit someone to set up Saturday morning for the bike event so I can attend again. But I have learned you can’t be in too many places at once (believe me, I have tried!)

Speaking of attempting the impossible, my hat is off to Burt Krain…he not only has championed a strong relationship with the Northbrook Public Library but now he has tackled our biggest challenge: filling Ron Harroff’s huge shoes as our Club’s auction manager.  I helped move some of the 15 boxes of stuff we have collected so far to a new staging area to prepare for the 2018 auction.  Years ago, this club had small financial hole that we could not fill.  We cut back on some services (like printing the old newsletter and mailings) – but nothing seemed to quite help us balance our books.  I even considered selling Radio Club Cookies (just kidding! But I do like my wife’s recipe for chocolate chip). Anyway, Ron Harroff took up the challenge one year when a ham donated his entire shack to the club. Well, this has blossomed into a serious activity.  It does help us fill the budget shortfall and even more in some years, but to organize this  takes a real ring master.  I am very grateful to Burt for accepting the job.  (and grateful to Ron for his leadership in this area all these years).

Finally, I want to give a big shout out to all my fellow Board members who are on the 2018 slate.  This will be my 10 year as President (non- consecutive years…I did have a break in there – thank you Don Whiteman, but this is my 17th year on the Board!  And, I am not the longest tenured member!  This has been incredibly rewarding and only because of the generosity and selflessness of your Board.  Thank them when you get a chance.  Together we have made the NSRC one of the premiere ham radio clubs in the country (OK, I’ll say it! Why not.)  

 

Hard to believe that I have served this organization for almost 18 years.  I have agreed to serve one more year as your Club President.  This, I realize is an unprecedented tenure.  It is not that I am power crazed…frankly, I have enjoyed helping us do the many things that we have accomplished over the years, and the list is long. I am proud of what this club has become and the many ways we have grown.  This is in large part due to the incredible other people who have stood up with me to serve this organization.  They keep me going.  This month, we will be announcing our slate for the 2019 Board.  I am thrilled that we formed a working group that talked to many potential candidates, in fact, this year, we had several new Board positions and several candidates.  Even better, we have been able to identify many who are willing leaders standing in the wing, people who have expressed an interest in serving, but need to clear the deck a bit. To serve on the Board requires nothing more than a willingness to help, to give some of your time to help others enjoy the hobby.  It is incredibly rewarding work.  I have learned a great deal from my colleagues on the Board and have been grateful that so many have stuck with us over the years. If you have an interest in help run this club, please let me or anyone of the nominating people know.  This year Dave Hewitt, Derick Bonewitz, Burt Krain and Jeff Kraft served on this team.  We welcome anyone to join us. We also recognize that many of us are starting to age a bit more…can’t do as much as we used to. We need some young blood with ideas to help us move to the next generation of club leadership.  All the members of the Board were asked to identify someone who could carry their position if they had to step down.  This will be my 12th year as our President. I took a break after 8 years, when Don Whiteman took over.  I would love to see someone else step up to take the reins of this fabulous club, so I can get back on the radio more often!!  Meanwhile, I and the other members of the Board are with you for another year. When you see any of them, please thank them for their service.

 

Meanwhile, one of my other passions has been to organize public service projects.  We did a great job for the Evanston Bike Club’s North Shore Century…I didn’t even get the gear put away and I am already knee deep into the Chicago Marathon. This is a best of a different color.  20,000 volunteers.  We support the 2000 medical professionals, providing radio communication to the field.  140 hams have signed up to work the event October 7. We attract people from all over the state and from 5 other states!  It is incredibly challenging, but also very rewarding. Every year, about 70% of our people return, which says a great deal about the ham radio community here.  10 radio clubs anchor stations, including the NSRC. Don Whiteman holds down station 4, but we have hams throughout the course…as leads, communicators, shadows…and we are not the biggest group!  I encourage you to get involved with any of these events to give ham radio a public face.  We do make a different, with your help. 

 

My blog this month must be short because I am jammed with both professional work and caring for my wife, who recently had her hip replaced.  It has been kind of a zoo over here…. I can’t wait till October is over and I can resume a “normal” routine.  Meanwhile, thank you all for your support to this club.

 

73’s

Rob 

 

August, 2018
 
10,000 steps.  That is what some are suggesting it takes for us to maintain a healthy lifestyle. 10,000 steps every day! For our Fox Hunt, I walked about 17, 495steps. I realize that the Fox hunt is not everyone’s cup of tea.  It can be a little stressful.  It could mean cutting through rugged terrain, but if all you did was follow some of the hunters around, it would be a good form of exercise.  Now, most of all those health benefits may have been lost after the event as we gathered for some adult beverages and food! (Well, some people did…hoo-rah for those disciplined enough to only order water!!)

We had a great night. The weather was perfect.  No mosquitoes.  Lots of interesting strategies at play.  The winner, as it has been for the past couple of seasons, was Warren Pugh.  He uses one of these newer synthesized foxhunt sniffers.  When there is a signal to track this device produces an audible tone that get louder as you get closer to the device.  It is amazing how effective these tools can be. Now, even with this assist, it takes some skills to find the fox.  Warren was at the hidden fox site early on, but it took more time to find where it was hidden.  Turns out, last year’s winner, Pete Walter- K9PWT, hid the fox right under a well-placed safety cone. This decoy alluded many hunters.   Pete left behind two of his prized Viking Sniffers for others to use. These little devices are amazing. They do all the work…all you need are feet and a willingness to walk. I offered them to some of our newest hunters, Tami Witbrot and Forrest Lamb.  Well, they found the wee fox and placed second and third respectively. Tami did it even in flip flops!  Proving that you don’t need fancy technology to get the job done, Casey Diers came in 4th with his home brew yard stick antenna.

I demonstrated to myself that even the simplest ideas will work as well.  I ended up using my radio and a paper clip in the antenna mount (specially hand made mount).  I knew I was on top of the fox but could not find it, even going to the third harmonic, so I drifted on and walked right past it. I did not see anyone else, so I figured I was lost or confused and was about to give up. That is when I ran into fellow hunter Marty Boroff.  He had a synthesizer device but with a telescoping antenna. Seeing him renewed my competitive charge to at least find the dang thing.  I knew I was not going to win.  At my age, even placing is a badge of honor. I charged past him to the place where I had been earlier and now found a few other hunters, basically confirming my suspicions.  My fancy dancy Yagi antenna and stepdown attenuator got me to the place, but the attenuator was not working.  It is on my bench now.  That is why I resorted to the paper clip strategy.  I came in 6th but proud that I found it.

Al Hovey handled all communication for the event at the Starbucks in the Glen and had a hand full of people with him socializing.  22 of us ended up at a little Irish restaurant pub down the street afterwards.  It was a magical night. 

This event is a time-honored tradition with our club. For years, we would start at the Harger Center in downtown Highland Park and then do our hunt east to the lake.  We had a very large area to cover, or so it seemed.  It would take many of us 30- 40 minutes just to get to the general vicinity of the fox…and we had to walk through a busy downtown area.  Imagine all of us pirouetting down Central Street with our radios.  (If you don’t know, when the fox broadcasts, you typically spin in a circle to see if you can discern a null or a signal strength indicator. People did ask, “what the heck are you doing? “In the end, the final push would be to find the Fox often cleverly hidden under brush or bush or trash can.  By then it was often quite dark outside, and the mosquitoes would be competing for our blood.  We moved to the Glen a couple of years ago to get a change in scene and try different terrain.  The Glen Town Center, the site of the former Glenview Naval Air Station has some interesting features and so far, has been an engaging place for this event.  I encourage all of you to try it, for the walk alone!
 
Getting Involved

We are seeing some turnover with some of our Board positions this year and will be seeking your help.  We are looking for someone to help manage our web site; help with internal communications; help with our annual action…specifically we are looking for someone with an eye for detail and enjoys tracking sales.  We expect to build a team to support this effort…we need a data cruncher to help manage the sales flow, a web salesperson and a team of folks to check and clean up the gear.  There are many other ways you can support your club.  If you have an interest in doing more for the club, please contact me.  If everyone does a small part, it makes a big job smaller.

ROB’S BLOG
August Blog 2018 10,000 steps.  That is what some are suggesting it takes for us to maintain a healthy lifestyle. 10,000 steps every day! For our Fox Hunt, I walked about 17, 495steps. I realize that the Fox hunt is not everyone’s cup of tea.  It can be a little stressful.  It could mean cutting through rugged terrain, but if all you did was follow some of the hunters around, it would be a good form of exercise.  Now, most of all those health benefits may have been lost after the event as we gathered for some adult beverages and food! (Well, some people did…hoo-rah for those disciplined enough to only order water!!)We had a great night. The weather was perfect.  No mosquitoes.  Lots of interesting strategies at play.  The winner, as it has been for the past couple of seasons, was Warren Pugh.  He uses one of these newer synthesized foxhunt sniffers.  When there is a signal to track this device produces an audible tone that get louder as you get closer to the device.  It is amazing how effective these tools can be. Now, even with this assist, it takes some skills to find the fox.  Warren was at the hidden fox site early on, but it took more time to find where it was hidden.  Turns out, last year’s winner, Pete Walter- K9PWT, hid the fox right under a well-placed safety cone. This decoy alluded many hunters.   Pete left behind two of his prized Viking Sniffers for others to use. These little devices are amazing. They do all the work…all you need are feet and a willingness to walk. I offered them to some of our newest hunters, Tami Witbrot and Forrest Lamb.  Well, they found the wee fox and placed second and third respectively. Tami did it even in flip flops!  Proving that you don’t need fancy technology to get the job done, Casey Diers came in 4th with his home brew yard stick antenna.I demonstrated to myself that even the simplest ideas will work as well.  I ended up using my radio and a paper clip in the antenna mount (specially hand made mount).  I knew I was on top of the fox but could not find it, even going to the third harmonic, so I drifted on and walked right past it. I did not see anyone else, so I figured I was lost or confused and was about to give up. That is when I ran into fellow hunter Marty Boroff.  He had a synthesizer device but with a telescoping antenna. Seeing him renewed my competitive charge to at least find the dang thing.  I knew I was not going to win.  At my age, even placing is a badge of honor. I charged past him to the place where I had been earlier and now found a few other hunters, basically confirming my suspicions.  My fancy dancy Yagi antenna and stepdown attenuator got me to the place, but the attenuator was not working.  It is on my bench now.  That is why I resorted to the paper clip strategy.  I came in 6th but proud that I found it.Al Hovey handled all communication for the event at the Starbucks in the Glen and had a hand full of people with him socializing.  22 of us ended up at a little Irish restaurant pub down the street afterwards.  It was a magical night. This event is a time-honored tradition with our club. For years, we would start at the Harger Center in downtown Highland Park and then do our hunt east to the lake.  We had a very large area to cover, or so it seemed.  It would take many of us 30- 40 minutes just to get to the general vicinity of the fox…and we had to walk through a busy downtown area.  Imagine all of us pirouetting down Central Street with our radios.  (If you don’t know, when the fox broadcasts, you typically spin in a circle to see if you can discern a null or a signal strength indicator. People did ask, “what the heck are you doing? “In the end, the final push would be to find the Fox often cleverly hidden under brush or bush or trash can.  By then it was often quite dark outside, and the mosquitoes would be competing for our blood.  We moved to the Glen a couple of years ago to get a change in scene and try different terrain.  The Glen Town Center, the site of the former Glenview Naval Air Station has some interesting features and so far, has been an engaging place for this event.  I encourage all of you to try it, for the walk alone! Getting InvolvedWe are seeing some turnover with some of our Board positions this year and will be seeking your help.  We are looking for someone to help manage our web site; help with internal communications; help with our annual action…specifically we are looking for someone with an eye for detail and enjoys tracking sales.  We expect to build a team to support this effort…we need a data cruncher to help manage the sales flow, a web salesperson and a team of folks to check and clean up the gear.  There are many other ways you can support your club.  If you have an interest in doing more for the club, please contact me.  If everyone does a small part, it makes a big job smaller.

 Field DY 2018

We said we wanted to focus on making field Day fun for more people and I think we did just that.  Field Day 2018 was fabulous largely due to the many new folks who showed leadership and accepted the challenges. Starting at the top, I want to thank Erich Grauke for serving as my co-lead.  For the 15 or so years I have served as your Field Day Chair, this event has grown in scale and dimensions.  It has under has become a complicated production…that is both a curse and a blessing! It is only possible with the help of many people 

To review and acknowledge a few people, The Demo area was incredible.  It was literally a fair. We had mini seminars on topics like: How to use a Rig Expert; ARDEN mesh networking; APRS; and satellite.  Thanks to Casey Diers for leading the charge with his interesting mesh network demo.  He had a small IP camera in the SSB tent that shipped a signal to his demo area.  He also had a N1MM logging software running so people could see how we were scoring.  Al Hovey did a “Why Ham Radio” discussion for many family groups that seemed to a winner. Greg Karlove outdid himself again with his satellite set up.  He had to fight off Murphy…but with a little help from his friends, they found a work around that allowed them to make at least one satellite contact.  He also showed a handful of folks how to use a Rig Expert meter.  Mike Simmons had a good-sized group gathered to talk about APRS.  Mike Cicchetti and Tami Witbrodt had activities for our younger crowd, although most seemed fascinated by Al Hovey’s bean bag toss.  The activities went on all afternoon and kept people around and engaged.  Kudo’s to the Demo Team for bringing your expertise and enthusiasm to the event.

Ron Settle served as the GOTA chair.  We had many, many operators of various ages and a full set of mentors to work with them.  I enjoyed working with three of the GOTA operators.  We went from folks who had never been on HF to at least being comfortable using the microphone.  There are a million skills sets to learn before you graduate to a full-grown contester, but you must start someplace. Plus, the skills one learns here are all applicable to all radio work.  Antennas, bands, protocols, processes and, of course, talking! Thanks to all who served your fellow hams as mentors.  Last time I checked our score for that tent we had a respectable showing…perhaps 200 points and that was before we calculated the potential bonus points (we can earn up to 500 points in GOTA).

For as long as I can remember, Larry Leviton, John Wass and Howard Miller handled the cooking duties for Field Day. We are very grateful to each of them for their years of service to this club.  Last year, we decided we wanted to make some dramatic changes to the food offerings. Burt Krain stepped up to lead this team…Howard Miller rejoined the group and Burt recruited Tami Witbrodt and Jeremy Dee.  The food was excellent. And many people brought even more goodies: sweets, salads and sandwiches.  Having worked through the night, I appreciated a little midnight snack!  I counted about 92 visitors during this period

The Bonus points represent a sizeable chunk of our final score and I am glad to say we have achieved almost all of them.  We did have issues with one of our generators, but we had spares…hard lessons learned from the past. We did forget some of our safety gear.  I did not bring fire extinguishers, for instance.  My fault, but I had enough on my plate with maddening client deadlines just before Field Day.  It was wet enough out there that I don’t think we were a fire hazard.  Cary Willis created a first aid kit for the event.  Jeff Kraft managed to get us some publicity in the local presses and we had two elected officials visit. Murphy may have squeezed us on the message delivered to the ARRL section manager.  Our Winlink station seemed to be on the blink again.   We sent the message but apparently it did not go through.  We will have to explore what is going on with that later. Mike Cicchetti distributed our signs all over the routes coming into the park. That really helped. And Mark Thompson delivered our fliers to the various locations around town. As mentioned before, we got our 100 points for a satellite contact, even with the issues we faced! The first obstacles we faced was that almost all the passes were too far north of our location to even attempt to reach the birds.  Once they got down to where ewe could work them, we discovered the frequency was not tracking. Randy and Mark pulled down the ARRL message.

Radios. This event could not happen without radios.  Thanks to the Elecraft K3 owners who shared their gear: Don Whiteman, Ron Settle, Dave Hewitt and Al Hovey. Dave spend almost a month testing and updating the computers and radios. Field Day takes a village.

In another display of leadership, Warren Pugh took over the job of being the CW captain.  He helped manage our two CW stations…scheduling folks in so that we had someone in a seat almost all night.  We are still tabulating our scores but looks like we had a solid performance in that areas.  We did have issues with some self-inflicted interference.  CW signals were bleeding into the SSB tent.  We moved antennas and while that diminished the issue, we still had problems.  Funny how what worked in one year doesn’t in the next!

Mark Klocksin was the SSB tent captain and manage our growing list of operators.  I help manage the late-night shift…and I can tell you we had a steady stream of competent operators and loggers throughout the night.  Sometimes it is just sitting there pounding away makes a big difference. Persistence wins.

Set up and take down.  Well, as I write, we are still cleaning tents and gear almost a week after the event.  Thanks to Jerry Weiss and Gary Gordon for helping Monday, cleaning critical equipment. This year was marked by a double whammy. I decided to move our storage locker and so I had the thrill of moving our stuff from one place to another.  Set up was made more complicated with rains…and I took a fun spill, when my feet got caught up in some rope. Thanks to Chuck Saunders, Hy Alexander and Don Whiteman for managing the antenna set up crews.  We had about 25 people to set up tents and antennas.  I had a small mishap.   I ended up flipping over right into a little pool of water that left me soaked.   Tripped on some rope while setting up the big Army tent.  Mark Klocksin has the incriminating photos and his ransom fees are more than I can afford, so they may be public soon. The only thing broken was my pride.

We will publish a link to our Field Day photos later. 

Overall…Field Day was another solid NSRC performance.  Thanks to everyone who took on new leadership positions and all who hung in there to do the heavy lifting.

 

Rob

K9RST

 

June 2018

Close the door on another successful Hamvention.  This annual trek to radio mecca has been a different experience for me on almost every one of my 15 or more visits to Dayton.  This year was no exception.  I spent more time selling some of our club’s donated equipment.  I had a ball. Selling can be fun. You must spend a couple of days doing research: How much is this item going for these days and how low could we go?  Does the item even work? What is its heritage? Then, the fun begins.  You offer a price. They counter offer. You say, “No” and they walk away. Some come and return and you start over and eventually the item is sold.  It’s a game.  But, you must do your homework.  We sold almost everything we brought.  Now to achieve this end, required spending much more time in our own location and not in the vender market or the forums.  Friday, it rained (it always rains in Dayton), but we sold a good number of items to other vendors mostly before the gates opened!

The rain slowed things down and made the place very muddy, but people persevered (we need a bigger tent!).  Greg Karlove set up our club’s pop-up shelter and brought a most of our gear in his truck. Burt Krain, Eric Grauke, Don Whiteman, Al Hovey all helped to hold down the fort while Greg and I took a break to bargain hunt.  I did find a few of the key items I sought but held off buying a HT radio.  I already have far too many anyway.  I was not impressed with the selection of HT’s out there…most do to many things and seem to have terrible ergonomics.  Too big or too small.  I wanted to get a replacement for my trusty Kenwood TH-F6A (now discontinued) but decided I would just find a replacement membrane for the keypad instead.  There were more vendors this year and more indoor selling than last year, but still the buildings could get very congested, very quickly.

For many years, I have been going to the QRP seminars and events on Thursday.  This year, they had over 300 in attendance.  People arrive very early to get seats, so it was almost full at 8 a.m. and the program didn’t start till almost 9:00.  In general, I did not find the seminars all that interesting this year, but the proceedings booklet that accompanies each speaker was filled with a great deal more information on the topics. 

The best part of Dayton was the housing adventure.  For the past couple of years, I have partnered with Bill Steffey, NY9H, a former Deerfield resident and member of the NSRC. He lives in PA land now.  He found this incredible deal with Dayton University. You can rent a quad dorm room, that sleeps up to 6 people for a flat rate (turns out to be about $100 for 4 nights per person). Unfortunately, we missed the opportunity to get the dorm this year and had to scramble. Bill and I do not like spending money on expensive hotels since you are only there for a couple hours. So, he went on line and found this incredible deal. It was near the university…basically, a single-family house that rents rooms. That is all we knew.  We arrived and were not impressed. First, the guy renting the place didn’t think two adults meant separate beds!  He came up with a mattress and I spent the first night on the floor.  Second night, he promised us the upstairs, where there was much more spacer (so he claimed).  He told us that we were the only people in the building, so we accepted his upstairs offer. When we arrived Friday night, in the first floor common rom, there were several people standing around. Our roommates, it turns out!

He told all of us that we were the only people staying…in their room (it turns out, not in the building!!). Each floor did have one bathroom to share.  When we got to the third floor, it was as he described – a huge space.  The one bedroom was also the toilet and shower. There was no door separating the bathroom from the bedroom. You fell out of bed and could just walk right into the bathroom.  I slept at the other end of the space.  This was a room built into the attic, so the roofline prevented you from standing straight around the edges. I was constantly banging my head the wall.  Look, we survived, and it cost us about $40…it was kind of a dump, but the price was right.  However, next year, we may be looking for a hotel wit a proper shower and bathroom!

The other part of the fun was working 146.520 on the way down.  Held several conversations with other hams. That made the travel fly by.

Field Day is right around the corner.  Hope to make some changes to the design of the event and want to encourage more people to participate in either the radio work or in the social activities.  I know there is a lot going on and some people have been frustrated that they cannot operate a radio.  There are plenty of opportunities to make Field day what you want to make it.  Just let us know and we will try to accommodate.  We will have the usual SSB and CW contest stations and are looking for people who work HF in the GOTA tent.  Sign up now for times…to be a GOTA operator, you should not be generally active on HF and want to use this opportunity to sharpen your skills. 

Stay radio active…see you at Field Day or one of the upcoming meetings

Rob Orr

K9RST


Road Trip

 

One of the best parts of being part of the Chicago Marathon Ham radio team has been the camaraderie from others around the country.  About a month back, I spent two hours on the phone talking to the ham radio folks who supported the Boston Marathon.  They grilled me on all manner of logistic issues and common concerns.  Amazingly, these folks conduct a weekly business phone call every week two months before the event.  There were 8 team leads on the call.  It was great sharing best practices and discussing mutual concerns. The Boston Marathon this year turned out to be a real sloppy, rainy mess.  We have been blessed with several race years with reasonably dry weather, but my fear is the all-day rain event. That would really kick the spirit of the volunteers and could prove to be disastrous for the event.  We have been lucky because you know it will only be a matter of time before that happens.

At one of our last events, a young man came to the Forward Command tent and asked if we needed any help. He had been on one of the mobile triage teams and looking at his youthful energy, I immediately said, “Yes!” You must understand at the end of the Marathon, people are generally totally spent.  Most of us had been up since 3 am. and had a full day managing radio traffic.  In talking to this young 30 something, I asked how he found his way to our event? Todd Johnson, KD9BNQ, lives in Springfield and was in town to visit his aunt. Plus, he wanted to participate in a large ham radio community event. Since he was about half the age of many of the other ham radio volunteers, I was eager to learn why he came to Chicago? Turns out he is an IT engineer at a university and was now the President of a radio club in Springfield and wanted to broaden his experience. I was hooked.  I offered to come down to his club any time to talk about the Marathon, ham radio or whatever.  Be careful what you promise, especially to young people.  He called me in January to schedule a date and so that is how I found myself talking to their club in mid- April.

The Sangamon Radio Club has a great 70-year tradition (and I thought we were doing pretty good with 39 years or so!)  They recently took over the top floor of the local Red Cross building for their meetings and club house.  I have posted pictures from my tour on my Smug Mug account for anyone interested in seeing the place. (https://roborr.smugmug.com/Sangamon-Radio-Club-visit).  They keep all their member badges in a common holder at the door, so you pull your badge as you enter.  They were all very cordial and listened attentively to my talk. Afterwards, they gave me a tour around their club house.  They have three radio positions…. two for HF and often available for members to come in and play radio. The other position is for their VHF/UHF work and digital stations. It was fun to discuss their experience with Fusion or D-Star and other projects they had been trying.  It was clear that these were my kind of people: experimenters, socially engaged, eager to share their experiences. I was a little envious that they had a real space to display their history and give their members (and the public) a chance to get on the radio.  They seemed to be a very active group. Involved with public service, training and new technology…just like our club.  It was a real honor to be invited and tell the Chicago Marathon Story.

Part of the hospitality included meeting up with two club members who offered me a room in their very spacious house.  Roger Whitaker and his wife have been leaders in the ham radio community there for many years. Vicky currently serves the State ARES team with helpful advice for public information officers.  She publishes a monthly newsletter, which we get.  It is often loaded with helpful information and tips.  She used to be a news reporter in New York and so she brings a world of experience to the job.  So here I am in Springfield…largely farm country and they open their house, their ham shack and their daily print edition of the New York Times.  I really felt quite at home. 

You quickly realize the bond that holds all of us ham radio folks together…and it is rewarding to meet new faces.  That is partly what Dayton is for me.  A chance to meet up with many of the ham folks I have gotten to know over the years. So, while it was perhaps one of the wildest months in recent times for me (business travel combined with family funerals), it was also one of the more rewarding. Ham radio is alive and doing well.  

Rob

K9RST

April Blog

Lately, I have been knee deep in programming radios for the Shamrock Shuffle. This is an annual ritual that requires checking all of the radios for the command tent, programming them with new frequencies and generally preparing for the public service season. This is not arduous but it can be brain numbing because so many of my computers have aged out.  My old radio programming laptop has XP on it…and my newer computers don’t have the programming software installed. So, slowly, I have integrated all of the programming software on my newer computers.  Part of the issue is transitioning from serial ports to UBS programming plugs.  It gets crazy fast.  All it takes is money and, just like that, it all works great! 

The Shamrock is the baby brother (or sister) of the Chicago Marathon.  It is a place where we get to play around with various ideas and new modes. This year we are experimenting with DMR and some chat services to provide a back channel.  Over the years, I have maintained some correspondence with the hams that operate the Boston marathon.  On Sunday, we had a two hour discussion about how we both approach this communication during these events.  On the call were 8 people who serve on their communication committee…and, the most remarkable part, they meet every week on Sunday from now till the event in April.  That impressed me.   Even though the Boston event had to virtually reinvent its communication strategy after the bombing incident, hams are still part of the program. Interestingly, they were working actively to remove anything that smacks of ham lingo from their vocabulary…even the words “ham” or “amateur radio.”  They are now communicators.  Not net controls, not command…they are resources.  Part of this to make sure the organizers see what they bring to the table as partners, but the other it to make it clear that they are there to serve the event.   As a group, ham radio hasn’t always done a great job of understanding where we fit into the service equation.  When I got involved with the Red Cross, they told me they would never use ham radio people again! I was stunned! Why not? Well, turns out the previous group got upset and pulled all of their embedded gear out and left them high and dry. This is not a single event…I have heard this multiple times over the years of my doing public service.

We have worked very hard to overcome this obstacle and have made it clear to our volunteers that we are here first to serve…in whatever capacity. We take communication seriously. It has taken a while, but we are being noticed by the served agencies and the event organizers.  That part has been rewarding as we enter our 10 year supporting these events.

I am also preparing for Dayton…at least getting rooms and signing up for seminars.  I often leave Wednesday of Dayton week and got to the QRP event, Four Days in May.  The seminars on Thursday are always superb and attract an audience of about 250.  They have activities that happen all weekend, but I usually end up spending all of my time at the Hamvention.

The NSRC will have its booth again. We are still looking for a few folks to help hold down the fort.  Let me know if you are going and if you can help out for an hour or so.  The booth is in a perfect location, right off the main midway where all of the exhibit buildings are located.  

Well, got to return to packing and checking antennas.

73’s

Rob

K9RST


March Blog

Well, if you missed this year’s NSRC dinner, you missed a great night. Our guest speaker, Skip Talbot, did an incredible job of explaining his work as an active storm chaser. I am reluctant to say professional, although he now does get paid to do some chasing. Largely, this is an avocation; a passion not unlike ham radio or, as he puts it, like fishing. He logged thousands of miles driving through the Midwest and west seeking storms. He says that’s normal. In the end, they were able to only document two storms. When they document a storm, he trains a battery of 4K video cameras and still cameras on the storm. Most of the visual information is used later to integrate it into more sophisticated computer programs to put a ground perspective into what is largely a radar image study. For one particularly nasty tornado, where several of their colleagues got caught up on the wrong side of the storm and died, they gathered the views of 90 other storm chasers and built a comprehensive view of the storm (they used lightning strikes as the sync point!). What they learned was that their colleagues were driving unwittingly right into the path of the tornado and there was no escape route. Their research showed that the usual rule of thumb about planning an exit had flaws.

Also, Derick Bonewitz’s club presentation will be a great follow-up to Skip’s talk - how to manage communications after a disaster strikes, using the virtual alphabet soup of services: FRS, MURS, CB and others. And this is a good time to get your Skywarn studies done. The more folks who are familiar with weather terminology and can accurately report conditions, the more valuable our contribution.

Typically, Skip’s work is used for television documentaries or ongoing academic research. His video and still images were just remarkable. He spoke for about 30 minutes but answered another 35 minutes of questions from the audience. Folks were into it! We had about 70 people in attendance. A good crowd. The food was fabulous and a good time was had by all. Norb Piotrowski, N9SS, won the 50/50 lottery, a nice round $100. He generously presented the club with the prize (for which we are all very grateful). Dave Hewitt did another outstanding job of coordinating all of the dinner elements. It is a huge job and Dave really brought all the elements together.

The dinner has always been a loss leader. We just barely cover expenses. Every year. Chevy Chase raises their rates (and we try to keep pace). We did a major bump up a couple years ago, but our expenses now are closer to $44.00 person (and we charge $45!) It is a great venue. It is really a lot of fun, but I think we need to look very carefully at this activity. We will be creating a survey for you to give us some input. A few years back, we did a wide search for alternatives, but really could not find anything as nice or accommodating. So, we are looking for your thoughts about this event. Everything…venue, meals, format, are up for discussion.

One terrific aspect of the dinner is the slide show that portrays what we have done in the course of a year. It is always welcome fun to re-live Field Day…that hot, sticky summer night…but also many of the other events we do throughout the year. I feel grateful to be part of this active dynamic group. Others have said it, so it is not just my jaded view, but the North Shore Radio Club is among the very best amateur radio clubs in the country.

From the PC files (politically correct). There seems to be a growing PR movement to change the way we describe ourselves…not as ham radio operators but as amateur radio operators. Both have their drawbacks near as I can tell. I suppose on many levels it doesn’t matter what people call us, so long as the world sees what we do. I am not sure they do, entirely. I am hoping we can put together public speaking teams to go out and tell our story to various groups hungry for programs, like the Lion’s Club, Kiwanis, and Scout groups. Many people are always looking for program ideas. If you want to get involved drop me a note.

Finally, I was all set to install my Fusion radio in my car, when the tea pot handle in the kitchen broke. That meant all hands on deck. I now have the handle dissected on my project table. It’s a mechanical problem and not an electronic issue; still I cannot resist the opportunity to fix things. More importantly, however, it keeps the XYL happy. Turns out, that is far more important than Fusion any day. One day soon…I will get that radio on the air.

73 Rob K9RST
k9rst@arrl.net